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Vote Now or This Fetus Gets Whacked


A pregnant couple from the suburban Twin Cities is putting a question to the internets: Birth or Not?

The abortion issue has been a controversial topic for decades that reaches to the core of every person in America. Often voters will even base their entire choice on this one topic alone, disregarding everything else the politician has to offer in the vain hope that their “chosen one” will be able to effect change on this issue.

We all like to think that our opinions matter, but so often there is no effective outlet for our beliefs to change lives. While most people have a definite opinion about abortion and take a stance as being either “Pro-Life” or “Pro-choice”, very few have an opportunity to do more than voice their concern to their elected representative. The concerns that we voice to those around us don’t seem to change the status-quo. Unless you are put into the position of having to make this decision in a setting that actually makes a difference, the debate does not affect anything.

Voting is such an integral part of the American identity. We vote on everything. We vote on things ranging from the best singer on American Idol to who the next leader of the free world will be. Wouldn’t it be nice to voice your opinion and have it actually make a difference in the real world? Why not vote on whether to continue or abort an actual pregnancy? Your vote can help a real couple to make a decision on this issue. 

I have a quibble with the assertion that very few have the opportunity to do more than nag a politician. 1.2 million to 2.4 million people each year (depending on whether the father is even informed of the pregnancy) make a direct, first-hand choice in favor of abortion. Over 5 million each year choose differently.

Lotsa pregnancies, lotsa choices being made.

Anyhoo, the site combines ultrasound updates about the fetus with updates about the vote tally (over 1 million votes cast) and reactions to their increasing public exposure. Apparently, the couple behind the website are not of the same mind on this life-or-death issue:

Pete has a history with stirring up the pot on the Internet as he often shares his anti-abortion viewpoints on sites such as Gawker and the DailyKos.

Alisha, who is 18 weeks pregnant, is actually pro-choice, and this morning she wrote a blog post titled "I believe in choice."

The drama and discussion now appears to be about the couple’s original intent. Are they just pulling a publicity stunt, or is there some truth behind their question?

That seems to be looking past the issue, which is abortion. On the site they proclaimed an intent for the site was to stimulate debate. Does it matter what their particular scheme was?

There is a genuine personal question on the table. Even those who lean toward life are intimidated by those who really walk that talk with conviction. Having a healthy baby is daunting enough. I’ve witnessed the prospect of a life filled with special needs drive women against their maternal instinct. This couple was not looking at a routine pregnancy:

Alisha said that two pregnancies ended in two miscarriages in the past year and a half. During the second pregnancy, the couple bought the domain, and were in the process of deciding whether to put the birth up to a vote when they lost the baby.

That article concludes with a bit of snark:

Regardless of your position on abortion, all of these possibilities suggest these people should never, ever raise a kid.

I disagree. If it is merely a stunt, it has been an effective one. They should be crafty enough to provide for a child. By subjecting themselves to this scrutiny, they are surely looking as deeply into the meaning of birth and parenting as any other couple. If they choose life, they will know why. And the opposite is also true.

The journalists seem to be concerned only with how the story relates to them. The couple actually cares about the baby. Isn’t that the first duty of a good parent?

A sidebar on the site says Minnesota law gives them until December 9th to decide. Vote there if you like (and you get to see the latest score).